Film Reviews by Ben Silverman '20

BAD TIMES AT THE EL ROYALE

Release date: OCTOBER 12, 2018

   Bad Times at the El Royale (BTER) is a mix of a mystery, horror, action and drama. Running at just over 2 hours long, this movie is packed with plot twists and great sequences - all perfectly executed by the actors. The near perfect script perfectly accents the actors ability to deliver, with the cinematography framing the shots just right. For example, I counted 3 single shot sequences in this film. The longest was just under 6 minutes, an amazing sequence that rivals that of "Snake Eyes". This, mixed with the amazing editing, creates a movie that not only has an amazing story and great encapsulation but also displays just how hard the director tried to make this a movie that would leave an impact. The R rating does this movie a compliment. This allows it to be more violent, which draws the viewer into the action and shows the realism behind the events portrayed. The amount of twists, unexpected shots and pure shock that BTER has is perfect for this rating. There were many times when I had no clue what was going to happen, and those times when I was in pure shock from a twist. This is extremely hard to do, especially when a trailer reveals so much (or so we thought it did). These do a wonderful job of creating a movie environment that is so confusing and unclear, however also increasingly interesting - a very hard thing to do. The throwback to "Pulp Fiction" that this movie incorporates works perfectly. The old time (almost Marx Brothers style) introduction cards and the jumping timeline compliments this movie perfectly, and adds an extra signature that isn't seen in modern day movies anymore. The (seemingly) square ending is a perfect closed bracket, however leaves the door open for a sequel and still leaves a factor of mystery behind. In conclusion, Bad Times at the El Royale is an amazing throwback to "Pulp Fiction" and delivers on its promises of superb editing, amazing cinematography, great script/acting and a plot that encapsulates the watcher.